COVID-19: Key stats improved, weekly deaths up 13%

Economy

The table below includes the number of new COVID-19 infections, coronavirus-related deaths, and the number of people infected in hospital and on ventilators for the week through September 27, as well as changes from one week to week for the past. four weeks. The closer the cell color is to green, the greater the w/w decline/lower (good) w/w growth, while the closer the cell color is to red, the greater the w/w growth is important / the more the drop w/w is (bad).

In any case, here are some charts on key indicators that show the main developments of the pandemic since mid-May:

When interpreting the data on the charts, note that the August 16 report contained seemingly false data that did not match the trend at all.

It’s worth putting the weekly changes side by side. Note that the reliability of the data is extremely low, but these are the numbers we have to work with. Apart from the fluke of mid-August, the data is consistent.

The “Ventilator/In Hospital” ratio has been steadily declining since May, although there was a peak in late August. The ratio has been rising steadily since mid-September and peaked a week ago, only to drop rather inexplicably to 1.1% on Tuesday.

Vaccination resumes, 4th dose rule

A total of 5,932 COVID-19 injections were administered in Hungary in the past seven days, compared to 4,824 a week ago, which showed a decrease from 5,318 a week earlier.

The daily average jumped 23% to 847 doses per day after falling 9% to 689 a week ago.

On the graph below, you can find a breakdown of the percentage of baseline and booster injections versus the total number of doses given per week. After two weeks of growth The number of 4th doses administered (4,936) increased by 30% (compared to 3,807) after an 8% drop a week ago. There was virtually no change in the number of 1st doses given in the past seven days (230), while there was a 24% drop in 2nd doses (260) and an increase of 13 % of 3rd doses (505).

Cover photo: Getty Images

Karen J. Nelson